Archive for the ‘New Technologies’ Category

Hydro-fold also does self folding origami

Christophe Guberan of Écal (University of Art and Design, Laussane) has developed a self-folding origami with potential package and multi-pack applications. While the approach and the process are different between this and North Carolina State University‘s self-folding origami we covered in our previous article “Self-folding origami may have packaging applications,” applications are equally relevant and […]

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Self-folding origami may have packaging applications

North Carolina State University has developed a self-folding material that may have packaging applications, especially in the multipack area. This material may potentially be used to self-open or close packages and multipacks, bringing a new level of consumer convenience. Check out the video below. ©2012 PackageRepublic.com. All Rights Reserved.

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Packaging tips from a carnivorous plant

We have previously reported on hydrophobic applications, non-stick coatings, and NeverWet. Recently, we came across an article from Harvard that also has packaging possibilities. This particular coating, based on water repellent nano structures of a meat-eating pitcher plant could also be extremely useful in packaging. Its applications can include not only helping viscous products (i.e. […]

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Smart jug from MilkLab

Here is a video of a smart jug that detects stale milk via mashable.com. Now only if we could incorporate it into the package itself. Your rating: ©2012 PackageRepublic.com. All Rights Reserved.

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Packaging 2.0

QR (Quick Response) code technology has been around for over 10 years. In the last few years, it has been increasingly used in advertising and communication as an aid to dispense information about a specific product, or promotion. Due to the monumental increase in smart phone deployment and usage in the recent years, the use […]

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Packaging applications for hydrophobic surfaces

ScienceDaily.com recently reported that engineers at the University of Florida have achieved a near perfect hydrophobic surface by looking at the physical structures of spider hair, and duplicating them mechanically. This approach differs from similar approaches in the past which tried to achieve the same results through material composition, not mechanical properties. Hydrophobic surfaces are […]

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Nano materials; RFID finally may be arriving

Wired magazine is reporting that scientists from Sunchon National University and Rice University have developed a printable RFID tag. The cost of the RFID tags were over $1/unit a decade ago. Back then, it was largely anticipated that in order for RFID to be fully deployed, the per unit cost needed to be at better […]

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